Are you really burnt out?

Are you really burnt out?
Kings and Pawns

The harder I work, the sooner I get to be king!
(source)

I recently read John Sonmez’s post on The Hacker News Generation.  I find articles like this interesting.  As I read it, the same thought comes screaming through:  WHY?

I wrote to John privately asking him this:  Why write an article like that?  What is the intention?

Regardless if you agree or not, I find articles like this either confirm or infuriate your point of view.  For me, it’s the same as arguments for Gun Control.  Both sides can argue all the reasons to (increase / decrease / whatever) guns, but who’s opinion are you trying to convert?

How many times have you seen a person walk away from a discussion saying “Wow!  I never thought of it that way, you are right!  We really should _______”.

It just doesn’t happen.

 

For me, the real problem with discussions like this is that they can be taken the wrong way.  Take this comment.  The author’s point is that burn out is real.  And his proof is a link to an articles of horrible consequences.

In John’s article, Iris Classon posted a response with a similar point of view.  I don’t have a science background, and I accept that “burn out” is a condition.  But when I read comments such as:

After two devastating meetings with potential partners, I remember coming home one day, climbing to bed. And not getting up for 6 months.

 

I am blatantly paraphrasing, in the preceding paragraphs Iris describes she is in a career that she is passionate about, but there isn’t enough work.

But I have to push back – two devastating meetings?  Two?

Then she continues:

But without my background in therapy, both as a patient and medical professional, I wouldn’t have made it out alive from the burnout- and found the dream I am leaving today. That I am 100% sure of. And my hat goes off to those that also dared to follow their heart and passion, even if failing miserable once or twice. I believe in choosing to make something a part of your life, without it being your whole life, and loving what you do and the people involved as much as you can allow yourself to do. For some people it’s what they do that is most important (in software development the task itself is considered the number one motivation, with social aspect being second), for others it’s purely the human interaction. And some just want to work 8-17 and go home. The second group is at a significant higher risk of being burned out, when intrinsic and extrinsic factors are there.

The choice is theirs. Ours.

And we shouldn’t judge people on those choices, because:

1. We do not have all the facts

2.One day you will be standing there

3.Generally I don’t recommend giving people a push when they might be standing on the edge

 

Failing miserably once or twice?

But here’s the real problem with her argument:  We shouldn’t judge because we don’t have all the facts.

Fair point, but:

  • You’ve put yourself out there (you wrote the article)
  • You have said we don’t have all the facts – but again, it’s your article.  Why not give us all the facts?
  • Maybe we shouldn’t judge, but people do.  That’s reality

 

Where is the personal responsibility?  There’s plenty of examples of many many “miserable” fails.

 

What Iris didn’t mention (and I’d love to know!):

  • Why did you choose to work in the dietetics industry in the first place?
  • I’m sure you felt “burnt out”.   But at what point in time did you notice things weren’t working out the way you had hoped?  Was it really after the second devastating meeting?  Was there really no warning signs earlier?

 

To be fair, and answer my own question – why write this?

  • Accountability is very important to me.  I don’t care what you say you will do, but once you’ve said it, you need an fantastic excuse / reason for not doing it.
  • The discussion to date feels awfully one sided.  I’m suggesting an alternative.

But that’s just me.  What do you think?

The problem with Tekpub…

The problem with Tekpub…

I like Rob Conery. But he is the sort of guy who just seems to go out of his way to cause trouble…

A good example is a post I wrote a couple of years ago.

What’s funny is that Rob even commented on the post. But unfortunately he missed the point. Rob is a classic “Ready, Fire, AIM!” type of person.

Case in point, I recently purchased a 12 month Tekpub subscription. (Tekpub is an online technical education resource).

Now a 12 month subscription for a little under $300 is good value. It’s competitors are either Youtube videos or companies like Plural Sight.

Last week, Rob posted this tweet:
.

Awesome! So why did I pay full price?

But that’s ok, Rob’s a good bloke! So I pinged him, asked if I could get a 29% extension, sent my Order Number (twice), followed him up…

And then? Well not much!

I don’t know what to make of it. Maybe he has updated my subscription? Maybe he hasn’t. Funny thing is that Tekpub doesn’t show when your subscription ends, just when you signed up.

I’ll keep you posted…

Home Theater PC

Home Theater PC

Recently Jeff Atwood of Coding Horror fame, updated his Home Theater PC. I had been thinking of doing the same, so below is my experience.

CPU Intel Core i3-2100
Motherboard MSi H67MA-E45
Memory Kingston 4GB DDR3

Standard case + power supply. I also added a 2TB hard drive + a Blueray writer.

Total damage: $800

Originally I installed Windows 7 Home Premium but had a few driver problems.

So I started again with Windows 7 Home Premium N and no problems.

How does it rate next to Jeffs’? 4.6 Windows Experience Index
Jeff managed a 5.1 – but I agree, take out the Aero desktop support and you have a 5.8 machine!

Interesting, Jeff got me all inspired when he started to talk about power consumption. He has been writing about this for sometime now. When I tested this machine, it was just under 40 watts.
Media PC Power Consumption
I have no idea how Jeff pulled off 22 watts, but he did say that he recycled old parts from a previous build.

I’m not too worried since a) this machine will be either in stand-by or turned off when not in use and b) a low power consumption device is going to increase the cost significantly.

For well under $AUD1,000 I’m only annoyed I didn’t do this sooner!

When a dirty job is a good job

When a dirty job is a good job

I was doing some research on Simon Sinek. He writes for AskMen.com and I came across their Top 10 TED Talks.

I came across this little gem. It’s a talk by Mike Rowe, from the Dirty Jobs show.

I won’t steal his thunder, just watch:

git, Windows 7 & error: error setting certificate verify locations:

git, Windows 7 & error: error setting certificate verify locations:

Very annoying!

I’ve been trying different version control systems for sometime now and I just couldn’t get git on Windows to work.

I was constantly getting:
$ git fetch “https://some.website.com”
error: error setting certificate verify locations:
CAfile: /bin/curl-ca-bundle.crt
CApath: none
while accessing https://some.website.com/info/refs

fatal: HTTP request failed
error: error setting certificate verify locations

I found the solution here.

  1. Open Notepad with Administrator privileges
  2. Open the file gitconfig. For me, this was in the folder:  C:\Program Files (x86)\Git\etc
  3. The line “sslCAinfo = /bin/curl-ca-bundle.crt” is using relative references.  Change this to “sslCAinfo = C:/Program Files (x86)/Git/bin/curl-ca-bundle.crt”

Too easy!

Where is tsadmin.exe?

Where is tsadmin.exe?

On Windows 2003, you can easily open Terminal Services Manager by clicking Start / Run / typing tsadmin [enter]

On Windows Server 2008 things are a little different.  I found this post on Scott Forsyth’s blog:

This doesn’t work in Windows Server 2008 anymore.  The change is ever so slight.  In Windows Server 2003 the tool was tsadmin.exe, so typing ‘tsadmin’ was all that was required to start the tool.  Now, in Windows Server 2008, this has been moved to a MMC snap-in and is called tsadmin.msc (plus tsadmin.dll is used silently).

So to fix this, click Start / Run / type tsadmin.msc [enter] and you’re good to go!